Archive for category 8K

Samsung Q900R 8K QLED Review

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The Samsung Q900R uses an 8K VA panel with Full Array Local Dimming technology and advanced dimming algorithms. Panel uniformity was very good indeed with no obvious clouding or pooling of light and no noticeable Dirty Screen Effect (DSE) at any uniform brightness level. There was some very slight vertical banding seen every now and again with very bright content, but with football viewing (or other sports or content with large areas of one colour during pans of the camera) it wasn’t noticeable unless you went looking for it. And even then it was really difficult to see unless you were making a point of looking for it and continually sending torture tests to catch it out. In normal viewing, it is barely noticeable and we only mention it to be complete in our assessment.

Viewing angles are not brilliant, but then again it is a VA panel and, as such, to get the best possible performance you need to be watching the TV directly on. Moving to 30 degrees or more introduces issues with contrast and colour shifts and blacks become milky. You also start to notice haloing and blooming from the FALD backlight when off-axis by more than 30 degrees. Watching directly on there are no issues visible. This is an inherent drawback of the VA panel technology but the compromises are excellent black levels and contrast performance.”

 

 

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Sony | 2019 CES Press Conference

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TCL Press Conference at CES 2019

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LG 88in 8K OLED with Crystal Sound

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Samsung 98-inch, 8K QLED

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Samsung Q900 8K TV 85-inch hands-on

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“An excellent-performing 8K TV like the Q900 looks a lot like an excellent 4K TV. Samsung showed me some 8K demo footage that looked incredible, but the bulk of material I viewed was lower resolution, upscaled to 8K on the Q900. Based on my experience at Samsung’s lab, all those pixels and fancy upscaling didn’t vastly improve non-8K images, even at 85 inches.

I spent much of my time in a dark room comparison, where Samsung had set up the Q900 next to the largest 4K TV it had available, the 82-inch 82Q6FN that costs $3,500. Beyond the resolution difference, the Q6 lacks most of the image quality extras of the Q900, including that fancy upscaling, full array local dimming and insane brightness. Samsung claims the Q900 can get to 4,000 nits in dynamic mode and 2,000 in movie mode. That’s brighter than any production TV I know about, and although I didn’t want to measure the sample Samsung exhibited (mainly because it was less than final), I believe it.”

 

 

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