Archive for category Home Theater Audio System

Bowers & Wilkins 600 Series 5.1 speaker system Review

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The 606 has a claimed sensitivity of 88dB and a frequency response rated to go down to 52Hz. On this model, and the rest of the 600 Series passive speakers, you’ll find dual binding posts at the rear, handy if you’re into bi-wiring or bi-amping.

B&W has reduced the size of the centre channel enclosure in the 600 Series, in the hope that the compact HTM6 will prove more appealing to consumers and less of a placement conundrum. This uses two 5in Continuum bass/midrange drivers, sited either side of its aluminium tweeter. Its a little less sensitive (87dB) and, as is often the case with a centre speaker, the frequency response isn’t as deep, going down to 72Hz.

In this package the entry-level 607 standmount speakers are on surround duty. They look almost identical to the larger 606 aside from the smaller (5in) midbass driver. Sensitivity is rated at 84dB, yet frequency response remains at 52Hz.

 

 

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Klipsch R-41M Speaker System $996 Review

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To deliver maximum bang for the buck, Klipsch pared down the features and connections of its R-100SW subwoofer ($349) to a bare minimum and put the focus on performance. To that end, there’s no wireless connection, speaker-level inputs, remote control, or low-voltage trigger. What it does have is a line-level input, a simple low-pass filter (that can be bypassed by turning its control dial up to the maximum setting), and a phase switch. It also features a forward-firing 10-inch version of Klipsch’s distinctive spun-copper woofer powered by a 300-watt (peak) class-D amplifier, all housed in a stout MDF cabinet.”

 

 


 

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Unboxing Martin Logan ElectroMotion IW 6.5 Inch In-Wall Speaker

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Bowers & Wilkins 600 Series 5.1 speaker system review

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The 606 standmount speakers demonstrated all these attributes, and proved extremely adept when it came to music replay. However, if you’re looking for a system that can handle music and movies in equal measure, then you might want to consider the 603 floorstanders at £1,250 a pair.

Listening to David Bowie’s performance from the 2000 Glastonbury Festival (CD), the 606 standmounts displayed a delicious musicality and handled the live recording with an enjoyable sense of accuracy and space. It sounded pretty much like being there, and I should know because I was.

 

 

 

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Definitive Technology Dolby Atmos Speakers Review

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Of course, should you wish to tweak or experiment, you can feed the Definitive Technology towers via the LFE input and treat the subwoofers independently. You could then use your AVR’s on-board room correction suite to adjust phase, etc. The pros, cons, and nuances of this approach and are far beyond the scope of this review (but addressed in our YouTube video above). Suffice to say, it’s there if you want it but it’s not recommended by Definitive.”

 

 

 

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Definitive Technology BP9080x, BP9060, CS9060 Dolby Atmos Speakers Review

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The CS9060 center channel is one model below the CS9080 for Definitive’s flagship center channel. The $699 speaker isn’t your typical center channel. It boasts a frequency response of 32Hz – 40kHz. The 1-inch dome tweeter is flanked with two 4.5-inch bass-mid woofers and an 8-inch powered subwoofer. The CS9060 is not a bipole design. There are no rear-firing drivers. It’s therefore easy to put the CS9060 inside or on top of a cabinet.

All speaker models (save the A90 add-on) are powered by a Class D amplifier. You’ll therefore need to make sure you have an electrical outlet close to each speaker location.

When the speakers receive an audio signal and turn on, Definitive Technology has a cool feature on the speakers where the letter “D” on the front base of the speaker lights up. If you’re in a dark theater environment and don’t want the distraction, you can turn the light off with a switch on the speaker’s rear panel.”

 

 

 

 

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Q Acoustics 3000i Series Speaker System $1,499 Review

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This setup delivered a sound I still characterized as “warm,” but now in a euphonic sense. Familiar material like James Taylor’s “Line ’em Up” from 1997’s Hourglass—one of my all-time favorite short- hand evaluation tracks— was superbly solid and dense, but still retained satisfying timbral definition and transient presence over the track’s intensely gooey, over-rich bass. Taylor’s distinctive baritone, warm and chesty but with a nasal twang riding along the top, sounded as expected. Maybe the warmth was a trifle accentuated, but the details of his breath and articulation were so well preserved that I didn’t object. Imaging also was impressively tight but broad.

Any speaker that aces my “Line ’em Up” test merits further scrutiny. I continued with an oddly effecting acrostic upon The Rite of Spring (which called to mind Stravinsky’s own, oft-used aphorism: “This too is possible…”) by The Bad Plus. Track ten, “The Sacrifice: Intro- duction,” amply demonstrated the ability of the 3050i towers to reproduce natural instrumental colors. Plucked bass sounded convincingly woody and vibratory up and down the neck, while the ethereal piano and drum shimmers floated effortlessly above and around. The 3050i’s slightly soft balance did not seem to exact any penalty on treble detail or openness: piano attacks were still light and ping-y, and brushed cymbals and snare lively and natural.”

 

 

 

 

 

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