Archive for category Review

HEOS Bar Three-Channel Soundbar Review

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There’s also a two-band EQ that you can tinker with to dial in the performance a little to match the particulars of your room, a feature that we’ll dig into in just a bit. And there’s one setting in particular that you’ll definitely want to pay attention to if you’re using the HEOS Bar in a surround sound setup. Right under the EQ, you’ll find a setting labeled “Quality,” which features two options: Normal and High. There’s no real explanation in the app of what these do, though. In short, this selects between two transcoding options for streaming audio to all of your multi-room speakers. High, as you might expect, transcodes losslessly, whereas Normal applies lossy compression.”

 

 

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Parasound Halo A 52+ Amplifier $2,995 Review

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The control and immediacy of the A 52+ made another track shine: “Good on the Ground” by the Vijay Iyer Sextet. In this freeform jazz cut, the saxophone and piano struggle for dominance over a driving layer of standup bass and drums. When I listened with the Parasound and MartinLogan combination, all instruments were distinctly conveyed, and the drums in particular had a muscular presentation. The standup bass seemed a bit softened in attack compared with the sound put out by my reference amp on this track, but overall I was impressed by the bass control I heard with most music.

 

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Epson Home Cinema 4000 review

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‘”To get an initial sense of contrast I used one of my favorite dark films, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2″ on standard 1080p Blu-ray. In each projector’s best dark room default settings the Epson and Optoma were neck and neck (and better than both BenQs). The Epson could get a bit darker in some scenes, thanks in particular to its dynamic iris, but highlights — for example the face of Voldemort as he looks over Hogwarts, were significantly dimmer than on the Optoma, robbing the image of pop in comparison. Meanwhile the BenQ HT2550 looked less punchy in most scenes, with worse black levels.”

 

 

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DENON AVR-X4400H 9.2 CHANNEL AV RECEIVER REVIEW

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Denon’s X4400H created a sound field that had both an excellent sense of height and width. This was helped in no small part by the X4400 upconverting the soundtrack to Neural: X which engaged the height channels.

The soundstage the X4400H created was big enough to place smack bang in the middle of the action. Combined with excellent channel steering and strong surround presence, the X4400H delivered both an immersive and engaging home theatre experience.”

 

 

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Klipsch Reference Theater Pack Speaker System Review

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Next, I turned to a live recording of outgoing music director Alan Gilbert leading the New York Philharmonic in Verdi’s Requiem at David Geffen Hall (CD). The recording seemed to soften the venue’s hard string sound, which actually suited the Pack Sats well, enabling them to bring out the natural warmth of the chorus and soloists. One thing the venue and the satellites had in common was excellent low-level resolution, which meant that soft-voiced passages didn’t vanish into the ether “

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Sonos Playbar Review

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This section is going to be a little different to normal sound quality sections on physical product for one very simple reason. The performance of Qobuz- and every other streaming service is more dependent on supporting hardware than almost anything that has been submitted for review on AVForums. Put simply, if you have a Chord Hugo 2 and a pair of Sennheiser IE800S earphones, Spotify will sound better through that than Qobuz Sublime + does through a pair of Shure SE112earphones connected directly to a laptop. I know this because I tried it and tried it on my wife too. In this instance, all that can be practically done is to compare Sublime+ with rivals over the same hardware. ”

 

 

 

 

 

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Epson EH-LS100 Laser LCD Projector Review

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The control panel includes buttons for selecting a source, along with an enter and an escape button. There are on/off, home and menu keys, as well as buttons for increasing or decreasing the size of the projected image and making keystone adjustments. The provided remote control is rather small and fiddly and there’s no backlight, which makes it hard to use in the dark. There are all the same controls found on the side of the projector, along with additional controls for directly accessing the inputs, navigating the menus, selecting the aspect ratio and adjusting the volume of the built-in speaker.”

 

 

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