Archive for category Review

LG OLED65C9 OLED 4K HDR TV Review

Read Here

 

 

Finally, you should always remember to handle OLED TVs with care to stop them falling prey to screen burn, where prolonged exposure to static image elements (such as channel logos) can lead to permanent ghosts of those elements being left behind on the screen. LG provides plenty of tools to help you fight this, including a feature that gently decreases the intensity of static onscreen elements to reduce their potential for harm.

Positives about the OLED65C9 overwhelmingly win the day. This is a flatscreen that can reward you with picture quality that’s consistently the stuff of home cinema dreams. It offers dynamism and clarity, colour subtlety and rich, deep blacks. Smart skills are comprehensive, and audio performance surprisingly effective. You can almost hear the gauntlet being thrown down.  ”

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

REL HT/1508 Predator subwoofer review

Read Here

 

Deep rumbling effects are like being washed over by a wave of LF that seems to bypass the ears and go straight for your wobbly, fleshy bits. Soundtracks have thunderous basslines, encouraging me to dig out the subterranean nightclub scene in Blade (DVD). The thumping track is engagingly solid and, while other RELs definitely have a little more grace with music, there’s no denying the HT/1508 delivers what the director intended from the scene; visceral and engaging bass.

For a REL, a brand born in sub-bass systems for music, a dedicated LFE sub is something of single-minded departure. Yet, just like the smaller HT Series we’ve looked at, the HT/1508 offers unrivalled value in setting out its fast, high-impact and incredibly powerful cinema sound without frills or features. A REL S/3 SHO costs exactly the same and arguably offers much more all-round appeal – but don’t expect it to move your gizzards and blow out the windows like this big-game hunter.

 

 

Leave a comment

BenQ CinePrime W2700 4K HDR projector Review

Read Here

 

 

The W2700’s new XPR DLP chipset brings another talent, in the form of improved black level performance. When our heroes escape from Hawkins Lab in Stranger Things (Netflix, Season 2, episode 8), through darkened corridors lit only by a flashlight, the projector manages 
to keep a watchable balance without crushing out the shadows. BenQ quotes a dynamic contrast of 30,000:1.

There are still limits to low-level fidelity from this well-priced beamer, though. As Chris Pratt hides behind 
a plinth from the raptor in the dinosaur museum (Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, 4K Blu-ray), there’s a void where shirt detail and shadow should co-exist.

 

 

Leave a comment

Philips 55OLED804 4K HDR OLED TV Review

 

Read Here

 

“Away from 4K HDR, the set’s processing works wonders on standard dynamic range/HD content. Detail levels approach those of true 4K, without exaggerating noise 
or adding grittiness. The Perfect Natural Reality HDR conversion system, meanwhile, introduces a nicely judged increase in an SDR picture’s brightness range without excessive or yellowy white peaks or black crush. So while 
I understand the purist appeal of leaving SDR images relatively untouched, I think you’ll struggle to live without PNR once you’ve tried it. Again I’d suggest sticking with the Minimum setting, though.

Where this TV falters is with its audio. In the plus column there’s an impressive amount of detail and scale to the soundstage, especially if you call in the (off by default) Dolby Atmos height option. And vocals sound surprisingly clear for a TV with no forward-firing speakers. A lack of bass leaves its delivery feeling a bit thin, however – even 
to the point of harshness with some settings or very dense mixes. Add an external sound system if you can.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Sony XBR-75X950G Review

Read Here

 

 

“Colors are a serious strength, though, not just in terms of their aforementioned punch, but also in their naturalism and the subtlety of their shading. While many TVs struggle with distinctions between similar colors, such as shades of red and shades of blue, the X950G displays different tones that are distinct and clear without blending into one another. Viewing angles are also very good by the standards of backlit TVs. We’re not talking OLED-like perfection here, but the picture remains pretty consistent from most points in a room.

This is a good TV for gaming, too, thanks to the punchy, vibrant picture and an input lag measurement (when in Game mode) of 22.4ms. That’s not as low as the figure managed by the latest and greatest Samsung and LG sets, but it is low enough as to be more or less imperceptible”

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Epson Home Cinema 5050UB Pro-UHD 3LCD Projector Review

Read Here

 

Watching the same scenes from Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse that I viewed on Blu-ray, but now on Ultra HD Blu-ray disc, I was struck by how much better this already great- looking movie came across on the latter format. Shadows gained depth and detail, and the increase in the contrast range caused images to pop in a manner that the Blu-ray version only hinted at. Colors also appeared notably more vivid and displayed a wider range of subtle hues. What caught my attention most, however, was the level of definition and detail to be seen in the computer- generated textures that Spider-Man‘s animators painstakingly employed to add a comic book look to images. This effect goes far to add a convincing element of depth to the otherwise flat, 2D animated image, and is best appreciated when viewed in 4K/Ultra HD. The ability of the 5050UB’s 4K pixel-shifting processing to pull it off on the big screen was nothing short of impressive.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Integra DRX-4.2 & DRX-4.3 9.2 Channel AV Receiver Review

Read Here

 

 

The DRX-4.3 is rated for 100wpc (2CH driven) across all 9 amplified channels with the ability to expand to 11 channels of processing via an external 2CH amplifier. The amplification section is traditional Class AB with a linear power supply and 2 very large fans flanking the rather smallish heatsinks. That’s a lot of transistors to cram into a single heatsink like this, which is common these days for Dolby Atmos / DTS:X AV receivers. Realize just a few years ago, these same-sized products had only 7 internal amplifiers. Now receiver companies are cramming 9, 11 and up to 13 channels into similar-sized products. If you were planning on running a 7.1.4 speaker configuration using this AVR, you’d have to add an external 2CH amplifier to power the surround back channels. Unfortunately, you can’t reassign the front channels to the surround backs so if you want more power to the fronts, I’d recommend getting a 5CH amplifier to power the front LCR’s and surround back channels. This is an especially good recommendation IF you’re running 4 ohm speakers for the front soundstage to take some of the pressure off this workhorse.”

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment