Archive for category Subs

Paradigm Defiance V10 Subwoofer Review

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This is a remarkably full-featured subwoofer that performs very well in small- to medium-sized rooms. A pair of Defiance V10s can be had for the price of a slightly larger subwoofer, but will provide a more even output at different listening positions than a single subwoofer.

The Defiance series has a variety of options to fit the needs of different scenarios. The V12 model is very similar to the V10 reviewed, here but with a larger, 12-inch woofer. The V8 model, yep, you guessed it, has an eight-inch woofer but also lacks many of the features found in the rest of the Defiance line, including app control, Anthem Room Control, and the ability to add wireless signal transmission. If you decide your budget can stretch a bit, the Defiance “X” series offers more power and refinement with a similar feature set.”

 

 

 

 

 

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Amazon Echo Sub – Hands On Review

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REL HT/1508 Predator subwoofer review

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Deep rumbling effects are like being washed over by a wave of LF that seems to bypass the ears and go straight for your wobbly, fleshy bits. Soundtracks have thunderous basslines, encouraging me to dig out the subterranean nightclub scene in Blade (DVD). The thumping track is engagingly solid and, while other RELs definitely have a little more grace with music, there’s no denying the HT/1508 delivers what the director intended from the scene; visceral and engaging bass.

For a REL, a brand born in sub-bass systems for music, a dedicated LFE sub is something of single-minded departure. Yet, just like the smaller HT Series we’ve looked at, the HT/1508 offers unrivalled value in setting out its fast, high-impact and incredibly powerful cinema sound without frills or features. A REL S/3 SHO costs exactly the same and arguably offers much more all-round appeal – but don’t expect it to move your gizzards and blow out the windows like this big-game hunter.

 

 

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REL HT/1508 Predator subwoofer review

 

 

Read Here

 

Deep rumbling effects are like being washed over by a wave of LF that seems to bypass the ears and go straight for your wobbly, fleshy bits. Soundtracks have thunderous basslines, encouraging me to dig out the subterranean nightclub scene in Blade (DVD). The thumping track is engagingly solid and, while other RELs definitely have a little more grace with music, there’s no denying the HT/1508 delivers what the director intended from the scene; visceral and engaging bass.

For a REL, a brand born in sub-bass systems for music, a dedicated LFE sub is something of single-minded departure. Yet, just like the smaller HT Series we’ve looked at, the HT/1508 offers unrivalled value in setting out its fast, high-impact and incredibly powerful cinema sound without frills or features. A REL S/3 SHO costs exactly the same and arguably offers much more all-round appeal – but don’t expect it to move your gizzards and blow out the windows like this big-game hunter.

 

 

 

 

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TDG Audio Announces Availability of In-Wall Subwoofer

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Architectural audio specialist TDG Audio has announced that the newest model in its Signature Series of in-wall subwoofers is now shipping.

Designed for stealth home theater installation between wall studs, the new IWS-10 subwoofer features a heavy-duty 10-inch driver in a one-piece, steel-framed MDF baffle with a paintable white metal grille that attaches to the frame magnetically.

The IWS-10’s mounting depth is 3.5 inches with outer frame dimensions of 17.2 x 17.2 inches and cutout dimensions of 14.4 x 14.4 inches. The speaker is rated for 4 ohms with reco

 

 

 

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Reviews SVS SB-3000 Subwoofer Review

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The driver uses a lightweight and rigid aluminium vented cone with a composite fibre dustcap, which is combined with a proprietary injection moulded gasket and long-throw parabolic surround to allow for extreme excursion and incredibly deep bass. There’s a dual ferrite magnet motor assembly weighing over 11kg, along with a flat edge wound split-wind voice coil within the motor assembly. Together, they deliver sufficient power at the highest excursion levels, but reduce mass and improve overall driver efficiency.

The driver’s ability to move massive amounts of air is backed up by a rear-mounted Sledge STA-800D2 amplifier, combining the high current output of discrete MOSFETs with Class D efficiency to deliver a claimed 800W RMS and peaks of up to 2,500W. All this is governed by a 50MHz Analog Devices DSP with 56-bit filtering that SVS claim is the most advanced digital processor ever used in a subwoofer.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SVS SB16-Ultra subwoofer $1,999 Review

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“Now let’s get serious about guilty pleasures when it comes to music — the kind of stuff we’re loathe to admit is on our playlists. I reckon what harm could come of this, so I start playing music that should not benefit from a subwoofer, only to discover that these tracks actually have low-octave content. Hot damn, there are bass lines to be plumbed in and at depth. Not what I expected and I am being forced, in a very good way, to re-listen to a number of recordings all over again.

The Dayton Audio subwoofer is indeed serviceable, with its 120 watts of amplification and downward flared ported design it comes in at the princely sum of $148.00. Is this model the last word in subwoofers? No, it is not. Is this model a great entry point for the novice? Indeed it is, and more. For someone as cynical and skeptical as myself it is not in me to jump in with both feet. So here I am, already searching out the upgrade path. I’ve got SVS squarely in my sites. Gary Yacoubian, SVS President, was so helpful in pointing me in the direction of Ed over there, so it is down to two models of theirs, both sealed box variants: the new SB-4000 or the SB16-Ultra. Either one would take me to a whole new level and, now that I am more at ease with the subwoofer as more than a concept, I am prepared to take that next step. I went with the SB-16 Ultra because size does indeed matter, and if I was going to risk physical injury with a component that size, I reckon I’d go all-in.”

 

 

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