Archive for category Subs

Sony ZF9/ Z9F Master Series 4K HDR TV Review

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SVS SB-4000 subwoofer Review

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“Even used with comparatively tiny satellite speakers and a high crossover, bass integration is excellent, although I did find I got better results using a line-level input from my Yamaha AVR (bypassing its onboard processing), than via the LFE feed. My only real criticism of the way the SB-4000 behaves is a slightly odd one. This is a superbly controlled subwoofer, aided by some clever DSP, but there are times when I’d love to be able to make it a little more boisterous. Compared to the GoldenEar SuperSub XXL, which can be persuaded into great hulking slabs of unnecessary low-end if you ask it nicely, the SVS 
stays absolutely controlled. I’d almost like there to be a ‘Ludicrous’ setting in the SVS Bluetooth app (to join the Music and Movie presets), which I could select when I wanted to behave like a five-year-old.”

 

 

 

 

 

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LEGACY AUDIO FOUNDATION SUBWOOFER $3,850 REVIEW

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“The cabinet construction was very solid for such a large subwoofer. It was very inert. This quality goes hand in hand with the super high quality finish. My review unit was black ash. I normally do not care for black ash but this one is different. To begin with, it’s real wood. Then it is hand-rubbed. The final result is quite handsome and I have no problem keeping it on display in my home theater. I love the look of it as a matter of fact.”

 

 

 

 

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Monoprice Monolith 15” THX Ultra Subwoofer Review

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The Monolith 15” THX Ultra holds THX’s “Ultra” performance class certification, which means it should be able to help to present a THX experience in a 3,000 cubic foot room with a 12’ viewing distance from the screen. That is a big space to fill, and the laws of physics dictate that a large sub is needed for that task (or at least a whole lot of small subs). The 15” THX Ultra is such a behemoth that, at a glance, it does look like it might be up to the task, but the THX certification is verified proof, so no guessing is needed. However, the 15” THX Ultra is only certified for that level of performance in one of its operating modes: all ports open and EQ switch set to “THX.” It isn’t that other operating modes will perform significantly worse, it’s just that they don’t have very specific behavior needed to act totally predictable by the THX controlling processor otherwise.”

 

 

 

 

 

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Klipsch SPL-120 Subwoofer

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“Klipsch uses a Class D 600watts power amplifier with an analogue pre-amplifier stage to drive the frontal reflex port loaded 12” woofer. This particular driver/amplifier combination, according to Klipsch, is able to generate an acoustical output level of up 115 decibels and achieve low bass extension of down to 24 hertz. Klipsch also explain that while achieving an extended bass response at a high sound pressure level is a desirable trait and a goal with all subwoofer manufacturers doing so without sacrificing low frequency detail is easier said than done.”

 

 

 

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New Klipsch Subwoofers Hide in the Wall (or Ceiling)

 

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“Both models feature paintable grilles that attach magnetically to the subwoofer frame. The PRO-1200SW’s grille is 15 x 15 inches. Klipsch’s KDA Series amplifiers (sold separately) have EQ presets and limiter settings designed to optimize the output and acoustic performance of the in-wall/ceiling subwoofers.”

 

 

 

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JL Audio Fathom f113v2 Subwoofer and CR-1 Active Crossover

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As I mentioned previously, the CR-1 confers a big advantage by splitting the frequency band with a true high-pass and a low-pass crossover. There’s very little overlap between the subwoofer and main speakers around the crossover point, eliminating the unpredictable result of having two different sources reproducing the same frequency band—the range of frequencies below the crossover point but above the lowest frequency the main speakers will reproduce. The combination of the high-pass and low-pass filter lets you decide, by listening, how much of the bass range is reproduced by the subwoofer and how much by the main speakers. If your main speakers have marginal bass quality below 100Hz, use a higher crossover frequency so that the main speakers never operate below 100Hz. Usually, a higher crossover frequency results in a more audible discontinuity at the crossover point. But the CR-1’s extensive controls provide seamless integration even at higher crossover frequencies.”

 

 

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